Turtle Island Restoration Network

Young-redwood-trees-prior-to-plantingTurtle Island Restoration Network mobilizes people to restore oceans, preserve rivers and streams, and protect marine and coastal wildlife, and their conservation initiative SPAWN – Salmon Protection and Watershed Network – focuses on protecting native fish and their habitats. SPAWN’s Ten Thousand Redwoods Project aims to restore and enhance riparian habitat for coho salmon and steelhead trout by planting thousands of redwood trees and other native plant species within California’s Lagunitas Creek watershed, located approximately 30 miles northwest of San Francisco. Redwoods are particularly important because due to their eventual size they not only provide shade and erosion protection for riverine ecosystems, when mature they also absorb large amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. In 2016 the Schwemm Family Foundation awarded Turtle Island/SPWAN a grant to help support the first year of a three-year project that will recruit volunteers to grow redwoods in a greenhouse and then plant them along streams that support fish. The first plantings occurred in the spring of 2016 and the young trees are doing well! http://www.marinij.com/article/NO/20151207/NEWS/151209832

Read more at Seaturtles.org

Lagunitas Creek at Samuel P. Taylor State Park

Lagunitas Creek at Samuel P. Taylor State Park

Lagunitas Creek at Samuel P. Taylor State Park

Lagunitas Creek at Samuel P. Taylor State Park

Male And Female Coho Salmon During Spawning

Male And Female Coho Salmon During Spawning

Young Redwood Trees Prior To Planting

Young Redwood Trees Prior To Planting

2016 Cycle 2 Update

In 2016, the Schwemm Family Foundation gave additional funding to the Turtle Island Restoration Effort to support their work to restore redwood and stream habitat in northern California. In addition to their continued efforts to raise and plant thousands of native trees and shrubs, ongoing work is being carried out by Turtle Island to conduct hydrological studies within Lagunitas Creek and to remove concrete, asphalt, and invasive plants along the riparian corridor.